How to choose the right duplex ultrasound probe

26th Feb 2021

Typically, a duplex ultrasound machine has two probes:

  1. A 12–18 MHz linear probe 
  2. A 5–6 MHz curved probe 

A 12–18 MHz linear probe and a 5–6 MHz curved probe for the duplex ultrasound. Illustration.

Figure 1. A duplex ultrasound machine has a 12–18 MHz linear probe and a 5–6 MHz curved probe.

The curved probe uses lower frequencies to see deeper vessels, whereas the linear probe uses higher frequencies to see more superficial vessels. The difference between the probes is just the depth of penetration. 

 

The 12–18 MHz linear probe 

Most peripheral arterial studies are performed with the linear probe because most of the lower extremity vessels are typically superficial. 

 

The 5–6 MHz curved probe 

The curved probe is usually reserved for deep abdominal arteries. However, it can be used in obese or swollen lower extremities where there is increased vessel depth. 

It’s really that simple!

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Recommended reading

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